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Haulover Bay (North)

Haulover North Saint John snorkeling

HAULOVER BAY NORTH

snorkeling beach swimming beach

 


Haulover North locationHaulover “North” is located on the East End of St John – and borders the Virgin Islands National Park.

HOW TO GET TO HAULOVER NORTH

From Cruz Bay – take Rte 20 ( North Shore Road) or Centerline toward Coral Bay. Continue past Coral Bay, Skinny Legs heading east. As you descend a steep hill you’ll see signs indicating you are leaving the Virgin Islands National Park. At the bottom of the hill is parking on your left or further up on your right. On the left side of the road is a narrow path leading to Haulover North. Haulover South is on your right – visible from the road. Total driving distance is approximately 8 miles.


Haulover Bay (North)
Once rarely visited, this beach is now quite popular with snorkelers. The beach is pebble with lots of flotsam and jetsam. Entry is easiest at the apex of the beach where the sandy bottom comes near the shoreline. Depending on wind and waves – this can be an easy snorkel or a bit of a challenge. The best times are early in the morning or when the wind is out of the south.

What makes it such a great snorkeling spot?

  • Healthy coral and fish populations
  • Interesting underwater patch reef structures
  • Variety of marine species
  • Easy access | short hike
  • Shallow water snorkeling
  • Underwater photos

Haulover North 360 VR


SNORKELING HAULOVER NORTH

Snorkeling is best along the western side of the bay where corals and sea fans grow in abundance – almost to the waters edge! Much of the nicest corals are in 5′ to 20 feet of water with many large rock and coral outcroppings to explore. You’ll see lots of fish including Queen and Stoplight parSnorkeling Haulover St Johnrot fish, Red Hind, wrasses, a variety of Damsel fish, Trumpet fish, puffers, reef squid and more! You’ll also see lots of hard and soft corals and sea fans. There are several large well-established brain corals, Elkhorn, firecoral, colorful sponges and tunicates as well as sea anemones.

Warning informationCAUTION! – Depending on the weather, tides and moon phase – there can be a strong current if you swim past the western point. Use common sense and never exceed your abilities and always snorkel with someone.